WILD CONFERENCE BOOK IS NOW AVAILABLE. 
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BLOCK 1: 12:40–1:40 pm

Supporting Survivors of Relationship Violence

By: Lara Rie Hayden (they/she)
Breakout session: 1

Location: Ontario Room

ion: This workshop focuses on learning skills and tools to use in collaboration with survivors of relationship violence to best support them through their healing journey. It  highlights how community support can help change the experience of healing for survivors.

Go with the flow: Making the most of menstration

By: Nupur Huria (she/her/hers)
Breakout session: 1

Location: Superior Room

This workshop highlights attitudes towards menstruation in different cultures and how we can learn to celebrate our bodies in a healthcare perspective, emphasizing the importance of menstrual hygiene education and exploring menstrual equity in our communities. Through learning about biological factors and the phases of the menstrual cycle, workshop attendees will learn about how to most effectively take advantage of their cycle.

Culture of arabian gulf

By: Kaltham Altaher
Breakout session: 1

Location: MSU Room

In the "Culture of the Arabian Gulf" workshop, we'll explore the similarities and differences between the many Arab cultures. Our discussion will also include Orientalism and how Western society views Arab culture through movies. We will focus on Arabian Gulf culture and attire, and you will have the opportunity to sample some local cuisine. 
The workshop's goal is for participants to leave with a deep understanding of this unique culture, as well as of the meaning of orientalism and the relationship between culture and intersectional feminism.

Pushing Back on Professionalism

By: Skye Monet-Ryanne Flores (she/her/hers) & Stephanie López (she/her/ella)

Breakout session: 1

Location: Michigan Room

Join Skye and Stephanie in this discussion-based session to explore the concept of “professionalism” and what it means to be a professional in a white, patriarchal society. How are the expectations and standards of professionalism regulating the lives of people of color and women/fem-identifying folx in academia and the workforce? In this workshop, explore how we can cultivate communities that center on changing the norms around professionalism, while also protecting our own peace.

Anti-semitism ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES

By: Maddi Jackson
Breakout session: 1

Location: Huron Room

Student Activism Summit

This workshop will discuss the presence of antisemitism on college campuses and the implications of it. It will break down what antisemitism means, how it's shown up over time, and different ways it has been used to harm Jewish communities specifically on MSU's campus. The goal of this workshop is to shed light on the reality of the need for activism, and how to get students involved in the advocacy for Jewish peoples. 

REFLECTION Space

By: Jada James
Breakout session: 1 & 2

Location: Erie Room

BLOCK 2:
1:50–2:50 PM

Restrictive Masculinity: Unpacking Toxic Masculine Norms

By: Garrett McAlister (he/him/his)
Breakout session: 2

Location: MSU Room

What is restrictive masculinity? Masculinity is not in itself a bad thing. However, through the misuse of power, it currently and historically has caused harm to others, as well as those who identify as a man, male, or masculine. In this session, we will explore the manner in which restrictive masculinity both internally and externally confines our actions, expressions, and reinforces unhealthy cultural beliefs and gender norms and work to reframe the conversation around masculinity.

Cite Me! A Black Feminist Politics of Citation

By: Yvonne Morris (she/her/hers)
Breakout session: 2

Location: Ontario Room

Black women and researchers of color are underrepresented in academic publications, as well as under-circulated in citations rates. Although Black women are intellectually prolific, Black women’s intellect and knowledge are often erased, undervalued, exploited, and are not included in academic canons. If the academy continues to reinforce and reproduce institutional racism and sexist publishing and citational practices, then this Black feminist citational praxis is its undoing. This workshop will discuss how we can demand inclusion of Black women’s knowledge production to be included in our syllabi, as well as amplify such citational praxis in our own work.

Testimonios and radical love in everyday social action

By: Dr. Estrella Torres
Breakout session: 2

Location: Huron Room

Student Activism Summit

In this workshop, we will discuss how we can witness and exchange testimonios for enacting everyday social action. We will explore ways in which social movements have used testimonio as an instrument of radical love for social action. The practice of testimonios has a long legacy of bringing to light injustices acted upon and enacted by communities. The workshop will begin with a brief history of Latine/x movement grounded in testimonios and radical love, followed by an exercise in sharing testimonios for coalition building.

Women, Life, Freedom! Zan, Zendegi, Azadi!

By: Natalia Khoshnam (she/her/hers)

Breakout session: 2

Location: Michigan Room

This workshop serves as a project-based examination of the feminist-led human rights movement in Iran. Following the powerful women of Iran from 1979 to present in their push to gain freedom and equality under an oppressive government, this workshop aims to educate people on the power of communal collaboration in the face of injustice and shed light and create connections to  the current fight for freedom in Iran, while applying what we can learn from this movement to the creation of a Zine. 

Queerness in Latinidad

By: Isa Olivio, Dreux Baker, Cara Drew
Breakout session: 2

Location: Superior Room

Student Activism Summit

Queer Latine people often are left out in conversations involving both Queer communities and Latine communities. In "Queerness in Latinidad" we will center those missing voices through the exploration of machismo, intersectionality, and colonialism.